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Below is the stream related to your search. In the left-hand column are the references in the Research Portal that are in your search item. In the right-hand column are the citations that have referenced your search item. You can continue following this stream by clicking the “View stream” button on one of the Reference or Citation entries.

References (5 in Portal)
Back in Time
 
Development and validation of the Working Alliance Inventory.

L Greenberg, A Horvath Journal of Counseling Psychology 1989

Present stages of development and preliminary validation of a self-report instrument for measuring the quality of alliance, the Working Alliance Inventory (WAI). The measure is based on Bordin's (1980) pantheoretical, tripartite (bonds, goals, and tasks) conceptualizaton of the alliance. Results from 3 studies were used to investigate the...

Cites in Google Scholar: 6087
 
The development and decay of the working alliance during time-limited counselling.

A Horvath, R Marx Canadian Journal of Counselling 1990

Examined time limited (10 sessions) counseling treatments to explore the history of the working alliance over time. Measures used were a working alliance inventory and a session evaluation questionnaire. Similar patterns of working alliance development were reported by 2 counselors across 4 clients (aged 28–49 yrs). The initial developmen...

Cites in Google Scholar: 220
 
Relation between working alliance and outcome in psychotherapy: A meta-analysis.

A Horvath, B Symonds Journal of Counseling Psychology 1991

Results of 24 studies (based on 20 distinct data sets) relating the quality of the working alliance (WA) to therapy outcome were synthesized using meta-analytic procedures. A moderate but reliable association between good WA and positive therapy outcome was found. Overall, the quality of the WA was most predictive of treatment outcomes ba...

Cites in Google Scholar: 4932
 
Working alliance in the early phase of counseling.

A Kokotovic, T Tracey Journal of Counseling Psychology 1990

The relation of the working alliance, as assessed by A. O. Horvath and L. Greenberg's (1986) Working Alliance Inventory (WAI), was examined with respect to (a) a set of client variables (hostility, quality of past and current relationships, level of adjustment, and type of presenting concern) and (b) premature termination status. Ratings ...

Cites in Google Scholar: 614
 
The role of the therapeutic alliance in psychotherapy.

L Luborsky, A Horvath Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology 1993

Traces the development of the concept of the therapeutic working alliance from its psychodynamic origins to current pantheoretical formulations. Research on the alliance is reviewed under 4 headings: the relation between a positive alliance and success in therapy, the path of the alliance over time, the examination of variables that predi...

Cites in Google Scholar: 2432
Citations (7 in Portal)
Forward in Time
 
A comparison of face-to-face and distance coaching practices: Coaches' perceptions of the role of the working alliance in problem resolution.

R Berry, J Ashby, P Gnilka, K Matheny Consulting Psychology Journal 2015

This study investigated the relationship between working alliance and problem resolution, among other variables, from the perspective of 102 coaches with psychology or counseling backgrounds. Results of the analyses suggested that coaches' perceptions of the working alliance were positively associated with problem resolution in both face-...

Cites in Google Scholar: 87
 
Development and validation of a revised short version of the Working Alliance Inventory.

R Hatcher, J Gillaspy Psychotherapy Research 2006

The Working Alliance Inventory (WAI; Horvath & Greenberg, 1989) and the Working Alliance Inventory–Short (WAI-S; Tracey & Kokotovic, 1989) are widely used measures of alliance in therapy. This study evaluated the factor structure of the WAI and WAI-S with confirmatory factor analysis in two relatively large samples (Ns = 231 and 235). The...

Cites in Google Scholar: 1609
 
Alliance in individual psychotherapy.

A Horvath, RAC Del, C Flückiger, D Symonds Psychotherapy 2011

This article reports on a research synthesis of the relation between alliance and the outcomes of individual psychotherapy. Included were over 200 research reports based on 190 independent data sources, covering more than 14,000 treatments. Research involving 5 or more adult participants receiving genuine (as opposed to analogue) treatmen...

Cites in Google Scholar: 3525
 
Take care what you bring with you: How coaches' mood and interpersonal behavior affect coaching success.

P Ianiro, S Kauffeld Consulting Psychology Journal 2014

The quality of coaching working alliances is crucial for coaching success. Determining the ingredients that contribute to a high-quality coaching working alliance is an important question for research. Interpersonal behavior is considered to be a vital factor for a successful coach– client working alliance. This study analyzes how a coach...

Cites in Google Scholar: 78
 
A large-scale study of executive and workplace coaching: The relative contributions of relationship personality match and self-efficacy

E de Haan, A Grant, Y Burger, P Eriksson Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research 2016

This large-scale study of executive coaching explores the perceived effectiveness of coaching from the perspectives of coach, coachee, and sponsor, and potential active ingredients including the coach–coachee working alliance, coachee self-efficacy, personality, and “personality match” between coach and coachee. Using a retrospective desi...

Cites in Google Scholar: 286
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Do we need alliance factor definitions unique to coaching? Clients’ operational definitions of research-based definitions

M Lopez International Journal of Evidence Based Coaching and Mentori... 2017

Vague definitional descriptors of the Coaching Alliance Common Factor measurement threaten construct validity in coaching research. Further, differing coach and client perceptions of the helping relationship, and coaching and therapeutic client dissimilarities compound the risk. Ten clients representing a global leadership coaching practi...

Cites in Google Scholar: 10
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